Silverlight, HTML5 and Dynamics CRM

The Glory Days of Silverlight

Silverlight is Microsoft’s plugin for web-browsers that enables running rich Internet applications, with features and purposes similar to those of Adobe Flash such as multimedia, graphics, animations etc. Shortly after Silverlight was introduced to the market in 2007, Microsoft quickly started to build knowledge around how to write and deploy rich applications and integrate them with Microsoft Dynamics CRM starting at version 4.0.

When you thinking about it, the need for custom UI integration with Dynamics CRM has always been there since the earlier versions. As CRM solution providers, most of us have been in situations where we can come up with a complex data model and we feel like the out of the box UI capabilities won’t be user friendly enough to drive user adoption. Situations like that created the need to build more user friendly interfaces to simply make people’s lives easier when they start using the CRM/XRM application.

To better illustrate, here are a few examples of when we would want to write a custom UI components in CRM

  • Display a tree view of related records with parent/child relationship.
  • Display complex search results: I’m thinking about PowerSearch which is a Global Search add-on for CRM. If you want to search for multiple entity types at once, a custom UI is required to display all results on a single page/view
  • Display timesheets, Gantt project management charts in Professional Services Automation solutions such as Assistance PSA and XRM1 (view screenshots below)

The Decline of Silverlight and the Rise of HTML5

With the emergence of HTML5, it seems we are headed towards a future in which browsers will support HTML5 tags natively thus enable rich content without the need of plugins like Silverlight or Adobe Flash. If some of us as individuals don’t believe this is true, Microsoft and Adobe seem to believe it is since they both dropped or significantly slowed down the evolution of their platforms. Silverlight’s latest major release (version 5) came out in 2011 in a world in which we see companies releasing software solutions at a very fast pace. The emergence of HTML5 have been well documented over the past year. There are still a lot of skeptics out there and that is understandable given how long it’s taking for the HTML5 standard to be completely defined and made available in all browsers.

Dynamics CRM: HTML5/JavaScript or Silverlight

What does this all mean for us Dynamics CRM integrators? The need to have custom UI controls is still existent and it will not go away even with all the new flexibility that we get with CRM 2013. Some data models will always be complex enough to require a better UI to give the solution its best chance of being used. In addition to that, there are still plenty of CRM add-ons built by Microsoft Partners that still use Silverlight 5 as a key piece of their solution. Below is a decision matrix that I came up with for us CRM Solutions providers going forward in making a technology decision when building new UI pieces for MSCRM.

What about the upgrade question? You have Silverlight controls and are wondering if you should built new controls in HTML5 and JavaScript. It’s your decision. Silverlight is not dead, Microsoft is still supporting it and it will for a long time. If you want to learn the new technology and have the time and money to do so, then go for the HTML5 remodeling. Keep in mind that it is a risk given that we have no idea what the lifespan of HTML5 will be.

What about buying an add-on that heavily relies on Silverlight controls? I don’t have a problem with that as long as it’s OK for you to install Silverlight on all client computers. Moving controls from Silverlight to HTML5/Javascript is A LOT of work and represents a significant amount of work for the add-on solution providers. They will upgrade when the time is right for them to do so (hopefully).

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6 thoughts on “Silverlight, HTML5 and Dynamics CRM

  1. Discussing this in my office, the issue of mobile devices was raised. Would you steer clear of an add-on that used Silverlight if mobile phone or tablet use was high on the list of requirements?

  2. That’s a good question… If an add-on uses Silverlight, it means there is an added value to providing a rich user experience inside of CRM. If you use a tool like that and you are not OK with your people having a downgrade in their experience on mobile (not as friendly and very different from the web), you are going to have to rebuild that rich user experience for mobile somehow (mobile app, mobile web site etc.).

    If the add-on solution provider doesn’t have mobile apps readily available to provide the same type of experience as on the web, then I suggest you try to estimate how much effort will be required to build a custom mobile piece and take if from there…

    Hope this helps!

  3. From what i know that silver light with CRM 2013 is not supported anymore, So Am I right? and if yes why you suggest that we still can use it.

    • Hi, it’s not a CRM 4.0 specification. It’s more your browser and where the HTML5 tags are used and displayed inside of CRM 4.0.

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